How to pay taxes by the status of community property

Taxation in the status of community attributes. Married people living in one of the nine state real estate communities should be particularly careful not to file a "marriage together."

General rules and property

Step 1
Determine if you and your spouse live on a community property basis. Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin are community-owned.

Step 2
Determine if you are filing a separate declaration from your spouse. Community ownership law is not tax related if you file a tax return with your spouse.

Step 3
Please note that when applying the rules on community property, you must divide your income, adjust and deduct community property - 50 percent for your spouse and 50 percent for you.

Step 4
In determining a separate property, ask yourself if you own property before marriage. This is a separate property even in a community property state.

Step 5
Determine if you have property in your marriage while you live in a non-community state. This is still a separate property even after you switch to the community property status.

Step 6
Calculate if you have money before you get married or if you earn money while getting married while you live in a non-community state. This amount is considered separate funds.

Step 7
Determine if you have inherited or been given property or money separately from your spouse in the marriage. This is a private property or private fund.

Step 8
Verify that, in your marriage, you have purchased property using private funds. This is a separate property.

Husband and wife live around the year

Step 1
Determine if you live away from your spouse at all times of the year and if you do not file a joint return.

Step 2
Treat money from your earned income and trade or your business as your income alone. Do not include any income from income and trade or business income of your spouse on your tax return.

Step 3
Consider interest from your cooperative interest and income from assets you own separately as your own. Do not include any income from your spouse's combined or proprietary interest on your tax return.

Step 4
Take a look at your Social Security benefits as your income alone. Do not include your spouse's Social Security benefits on your tax return.

Step 5
Consider interest rates, dividends and income from assets under common ownership in accordance with community property rules.

Step 6
Consider retirement pensions and civil assistance are only community property income if two people are married and live in a community state at the time of military service or civil service employment. If not, consider it a separate income.

Husband and wife do not live outside the year

Step 1
Determine if you lived with your spouse at some point during the tax year and if you did not file a joint return.

Step 2
Treat all money from income, trade or business, partnership, dividends, interests, and assets under common ownership according to community rules - divide it by fifty-five years for the period you live with. together.

Step 3
Consider retirement pensions and civil assistance are only community property income if two people are married and live in a community state at the time of military service or civil service employment. If not, consider it a separate income.

Step 4
Look at income from separate assets such as separate income in Arizona, California, Nevada, New Mexico and Washington. Consider it's community income in Idaho, Louisiana, Texas, and Wisconsin.

How to pay taxes by the status of community property

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